Guest-Starring: Jennifer Rosenberg!

Today’s toon was sponsored by Jennifer’s husband and long-time reader Dan Greenberg. For Jennifer’s custom ‘toon, Dan wrote:

My wife, Jennifer is a fantastic woman. I could go on and on about her as daughter, wife, mother. But the thing that might most make her a good guest star is her skill at gaining proper customer service. When customer service is inadequate, inefficient, or insulting, Jennifer rapidly finds the email address for the most senior executives in the company and offers them free consulting on how they can improve. (That’s to say, they get a pointed missive.) Imagine the CEO (and VP Customer Service) of Bogus Buy getting an email discussing Bob’s inadequacies at the help desk….

Dan and Jennifer will receive a signed color print and the original sketch used to craft her custom ‘toon. The money earned from this guest-star ‘toon went towards the 100 for Cindy donation. A total of $200 was raised by PCW readers alone to help Cindy Randi, a three time cancer survivor.

Thanks for your support, Dan! Hope Jennifer enjoys her ‘toon!

-Krishna

P.S. Jennifer now appears on the Featured Guest-Stars Page. Would you like to
guest-star in your own PC Weenies ‘toon? It’s easy-peasy!

About the author

Krishna Sadasivam creates custom comics and illustrations for organizations, magazines and companies. A champion of comics advocacy, Krishna speaks, blogs, and writes articles on illustration and sequential arts techniques and the importance of the comics medium in both education and brand awareness. His clients have included Microsoft, Mashable, Other World Computing and EE Times. His work has been featured on many notable websites, including TechCrunch, Gizmodo and CNET. His portfolio can be found at krishnadraws.com.

These beautiful and intelligent people wrote

  • Jennifer RosenbergReply
    November 19, 2008 at 10:42 am

    Thank you Krishna. Hope that everyone learns they can easily contact CEOs, VPs of Customer Service when they have an issue with a product or company. More importantly, I’m happy that this was in support of such a worthy cause.

    Jennifer

  • FleetCommanderReply
    November 19, 2008 at 11:46 am

    Unfortunately, there are people who abuse this.

    I’ve been on the receiving end of this line. If there is a problem, and I can help, I try. There are times where I can’t do anything to assist a customer. There’s nothing more angering then a directive from one of the Powers That be saying “Fix it!” WHEN I CAN’T.

    How would you like to deal with a congressional inquiry because someone couldn’t get their e-mail? Yes, I have…and it was hell.

    If you’ve got some jerk that’s not doing their job, light ‘em up. If there’s another problem, please try to work it out before calling in the big guns…

  • Dave BergschneiderReply
    November 19, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    This is all so true in just about any organization. Whom ever cries the loudest and manages to reach the execs get the highest priority of that moment.

  • DanReply
    November 19, 2008 at 5:25 pm

    The big guns’ job is to make sure this is right. If they don’t, they deserve all the email they get. And if they then manage their people poorly, they deserve the poor performance of the organization that will eventually lead to their ouster.

    And you’d be surprised. Going up the chain requires a lot of time and results in a lot of filters, FleetCommander. Jennifer has gotten responses where it’s clear the executives literally did not know about basic things like “no one put the return policy on the website” until she gave them her free consultation. Or the time I told the President of a large computer company that the 800 number they indicated for billing problems was nonfunctional and therefore he’d get an erroneous report that some deadbeat did not call back.

    People gave Bill Gates a lot of s^&t for a famous leaked email tirade (http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/microsoft/archives/141821.asp). In fact, if all CEOs did what Mr. Gates had done… actually tried to buy and use his/her own product… then a lot fewer notes to CEOs would get written (and a lot more internal tirades would be).

Tell me what you think!