Type and Comics: The Comicraft Experience

Comicraft, maker and purveyor of quality comic book fonts, is announcing a special $20.13 sale on all its fonts for one day only (January 1, 2013). They offer this sale every New Year’s Day, making the price of every font on their site match the incoming new year.

Whether you make comics or not, you’ll find a lot of great, attention getting fonts to choose from on their website. Normally, the fonts range in price from $19 to $395. (The regular prices are hidden during the sale.) You’ll find a host of fonts to choose from, properly organized into categories (Balloon Lettering, Custom Voices, Sound Effects, etc.) and sub-categories within each. Comicraft also includes a handy 64 page book on comic book lettering that I hope to check out some day.

How does it work?

Simply place the fonts you want in your shopping cart, proceed to checkout, and click the link provided for you to download your shiny new fonts.

Once you’ve retrieved your fonts, you need to install them:

Why buy fonts, when there are so many free options to choose from?

Simply put – these are professionally hand-lettered fonts. They can be used in a wide variety of areas: presentations, holiday cards, home movies, brochures, motion graphics and – of course – comics. Typography and typefaces are important elements within design – if they weren’t, people would still be using Comic Sans and Papyrus. Put it this way: if fonts weren’t a big deal, would there even be “Helvetica the Movie”?

In short, when you buy a font, you are paying for time and energy it takes to custom craft these fonts. You are also paying for the license to use the fonts in your projects (commercial or non-commercial). Besides, certain “free” fonts aren’t so free when you look closely at their licensing terms.

There are a ton of great fonts to choose from on Comicraft’s site. Here are the fonts I’m buying this time around:

Monologous: ($129)

Excalibur Stone: ($59)

SezWhoSezYou: ($59)

ThatsAllFolks: ($59)

Which fonts are you getting?

-Krishna

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About the author

Krishna Sadasivam creates custom comics and illustrations for organizations, magazines and companies. A champion of comics advocacy, Krishna speaks, blogs, and writes articles on illustration and sequential arts techniques and the importance of the comics medium in both education and brand awareness. His clients have included Microsoft, Mashable, Other World Computing and EE Times. His work has been featured on many notable websites, including TechCrunch, Gizmodo and CNET. His portfolio can be found at krishnadraws.com.

These beautiful and intelligent people wrote

  • MichaelReply
    January 1, 2013 at 10:33 am

    I can’t decide! There are too many!

  • BC in Austin TXReply
    January 3, 2013 at 3:33 pm

    For 2013 my nine year old daughter chose Danger Girl! and Treasure Trove. The fun part is that I wouldn’t have chosen these on my own, but already we’ve found uses for both! Gotta Love John and the crew at Comicraft!

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