Review: Mount-It! Articulating Dual Arm Computer Monitor Desk Mount

Looking for more desk space? Have a dual display setup? Want more flexibility in adjusting your displays’ position? How about a solution that’s easy on the wallet?

That’s a tall order for any product – let alone one that sells for under $60 on Amazon.

And so, with credit card in hand and a mild dose of skepticism, I placed an order for the Mount-It! Articulating Dual Arm Computer Monitor Desk Mount (or Mount-It, as I will refer to it from here on out).

Mount It: The Box

So… does it live up to my expectations? Read on to find out…

What’s in the Box

Mount It: What's in the box...

Billed on the box as “professional TV mounts”, the Mount-It unit (Model MI-752) comes well packed. Inside the box are two smaller boxes. One of the boxes contains the Mount-It base, packed in a protective plastic sheath. The other box contains the arms, various screws / washers, an alan wrench, and a quick setup pamphlet (all of which are also encased in a plastic sheath). The packaging is superb.

The build quality on both the Mount-It arms and base are impressive. Both units are made of metal and are rock solid. There is no skimping or cutting corners here. The overall unit weighs 12 lbs.

Assembly

Assembly is straight forward. The included pamphlet has four basic steps.

The first step in the assembly is to mount the base onto your desk. Using the supplied alan wrench, I attached the C-clamp to the metal base. The metal base includes three sets of holes to accommodate various table-tops. The included clamps provide extra support to anchor the base. After tightening the clamps, the base was firm and secure.

Mount It: C-clamp support

Two screws on the back of the arm are needed to secure the arms to the base, which contains holes along its back to accommodate height adjustment. I set mine to the highest level (shown below).

Mount It: Arms installed

The arms have three points of articulation, which gives the user the ability to adjust the display position on the fly. The points of articulation are firm and stiff – but easily adjustable.

Both of my displays allow for the possibility of VESA mounting. In order to use my displays with the Mount-It kit, I had to first remove their stands. The Dell was a breeze to remove; the HP required a peek at the documentation to properly dislodge the display from its stand.

The Mount-It kit includes options for displays that are flat and curved. It just so happens that my monitor setup includes both. My HP display, which is flush on the back, only required four supplied screws and washers to affix it to the arm.

Mount It: Flush display connection

My Dell display, which has a slightly rounded back, required the addition of 4 spacers (also included in the box).

Mount It: risers for rounded displays

The Mount-It unit takes into account cable management. Along the arms are two sets of plastic clamps. The Mount-It base, which is hollow, also allows for cables to pass through the unit.

Mount It Arm: cable management

I was able to install both monitors onto the Mount-It on my own – but if I had to do it again, I would have asked my wife to help me. There was more than one occasion where the mount’s screws / washers slid out of their holes before I could bring the display close enough to secure it. Here’s a photo showing the completed install, from the back.

Mount It Arms: back view

And here’s a shot of the Mount-It from the front. Both my monitors are now suspended on the Mount-It arms, giving me more desk space to work with.
Mount It Arms in action!

Furthermore, I can now bring the displays towards me or away from me, as needed. The monitors can also be tilted downward or upward. Again, there is enough of a resistance on the arm’s hinges to where gentle force is needed to tilt the displays. It’s not a big deal; I actually prefer it this way because I don’t have to worry about my displays “drooping” after I’ve adjusted their tilt to my liking.

So… Is It Worth It?

For me, the answer is an unequivocal: “Hell yeah.” The Mount-It kit retails for $160 – so $60 is a steal for what you get. I purchased mine from Amazon. It should be noted that the maximum display size this unit can accommodate are two 27″ displays. Both of my displays are 24″ and the arms easily supported the weight.

In summary, the Mount-It Articulating Dual Arm Computer Monitor Desk Mount is well built, durable, flexible and aesthetically pleasing. I couldn’t find any problem with the unit whatsoever. If you have two displays and need more desk space, you would do well to buy this kit. The Mount-It! kit earns 5 out of 5 Bob Weiners.


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About the author

Krishna Sadasivam creates custom comics and illustrations for organizations, magazines and companies. A champion of comics advocacy, Krishna speaks, blogs, and writes articles on illustration and sequential arts techniques and the importance of the comics medium in both education and brand awareness. His clients have included Microsoft, Mashable, Other World Computing and EE Times. His work has been featured on many notable websites, including TechCrunch, Gizmodo and CNET. His portfolio can be found at krishnadraws.com.

  • Phillyg

    I notice that the box says “either in portrait or landscape”! Does this mean that the monitors can not pivot on the stand? My current setup is two HP 2335 pivoting monitors. The supplied stands allow the displays to pivot. While articulating arms would be a big improvement; that’s only if pivoting is preserved.

    • Krishna

      Good question – alas, you won’t be able to rotate the displays once they are set. In my case, it’s not so much of an issue – but it’s certainly worth mentioning. Thanks, Phillyg!

  • Shane

    I think more to the point is that it lifts the displays up to a decent hight. In the old days you had a box sitting on the desk and the monitor on top of that bringing the bottom of the monitor a good 8 or 9 inches off the desk. Now days the tower goes on the floor and the monitor sits less than 4 inches off the desk making you look down at it all day. Funny how ergonomics goes from important to historic when things look good.

    • KMan

      Proper ergonomics posit that you should be looking down slightly at your monitors. Looking straight ahead, or worse, slightly up, is really bad for your neck. In “the good old days” we didn’t know any better… or ignored what was known, as expensive on-the-job injuries took time to build up.
      http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/computerworkstations/components_monitors.html

      • http://www.pcweenies.com Krishna Sadasivam

        Excellent point, KMan!